Bhumi sat down to talk to Katrina Hutchinson-O’Neil on the role of a Contingent Program Manager.

Katrina is a resourcing professional and has worked in talent acquisition for 16 years. She recently set up her own TA Consultancy helping organisations attract talent, both contingent and permanent.

Systems for the Contingent Program Manager

Katrina starts by explaining that contingent resourcing can be very complicated and requires a lot of preparation work. She has worked with companies where senior procurement professionals can take up to 12-15 months to get up to speed with the commercial side of the contingent world, without factoring in the HR side.

People working within the talent acquisition space should be enthusiastic about the introduction of eco-system products. This allows in-house recruitment an amalgamation of different systems and has allowed forward-thinking TA teams to become much more strategic.

Challenges in Contingent Management

One challenge with technology is that you will always have the early adopters vs people working within organisations where it takes a long time to deliver the change. Many things may have evolved by the time, they reach that point.

Contingent Program Managers sit within Talent Acquisition. The pipeline of the future is unlikely to differentiate between the type of contract people are on, so there should be no separation between permanent and temporary workers.

Katrina is worried that changes with IR35 will, unfortunately, deepen the divide with contingent workers. This could, as a result, leave them feeling like ‘second class citizens’ within an organisation. This will have a negative impact when trying to get the most out of this contingent workforce.

Where do you start?

The biggest challenge companies seem to face with their contingent workforce tends to be ‘Where do you start?.’ What is breadth/scope of their contingent worker population and what defines someone as a contingent worker.

There are also issues with the political drivers around people’s use of contingent workers. They tend to be used because the organisation may have clamped down on headcount, rather than the enlightened view that this is the way of the future.

Katrina also believes that it still feels complicated and there are not many people who hold the skills to come into the organisation and help to introduce a contingent workforce programme.

There does tend to be a bias towards contingent workforce within the organisation, which needs to be tackled. Other employees may see a contingent workers day rate and calculate that they earn x % more for doing the same job. They forget this does not take into consideration the benefits full-time employees are entitled to.

If you would like to watch the full discussion, you can do so here.

Bhumi
Founder & CEO at
Bhumika Zhaveri has expertise in business strategy, change, human resources and talent management. Her experience is built over years in various sectors via her consulting in HR, Resourcing and Transformation. Now as Founder & CEO of InteriMarket a platform for in-house teams and companies to hire, engage and retain their skilled contract talent. She is a firm believer of success through people, change and culture in the future of work!

Written By
Bhumi
Founder & CEO at
Bhumika Zhaveri has expertise in business strategy, change, human resources and talent management. Her experience is built over years in various sectors via her consulting in HR, Resourcing and Transformation. Now as Founder & CEO of InteriMarket a platform for in-house teams and companies to hire, engage and retain their skilled contract talent. She is a firm believer of success through people, change and culture in the future of work!